Here’s our wonderful book list

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I HEARD THE OWL CALL MY NAME by Margaret Craven
A modern Canadian classic which deals with the experiences of a young priest assigned to a remote Indian community whose culture is being broken down by modern civilization.

THE GHOST ROAD by Pat Barker
The 1995 Booker Prize winner. The starkly written story looks at the role of war in culture, and how war engulfs men’s lives.

LAST ORDERS by Graham Swift
A Booker prize winner, this tells the story of a group of men carrying out the ‘last orders’ of their friend. The history of each man’s friendship with the dead man is revealed before his final resting place is reached.

THE GREAT GATSBY by F. Scott Fitzgerald
A classic story of the ‘great American dream’,which is as current today as in the twenties.

LAMBS OF GOD by Marele Day
Some nuns live in an old convent on an island, forgotten by everyone. Then a bright young priest comes to assess the property for development and the nuns’ way of life is threatened. A delightful tale.

THE MOON AND SIXPENCE by Somerset Maugham
This 1919 classic is a novel which is based loosely on the life of Paul Gauguin. Interesting characters, and an enlightening look at the morals of the time.

THE DRESSMAKER by Rosalie Ham
She returns home to an isolated 1950’s Australian country town to see her mother. Before she leaves, she has turned the place upside down. Quirky and amusing.

ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT by Erich Maria Remarque
The classic novel of the Great War, told from a German viewpoint, but universal in its ideas and conclusions.

OFFICERS’ WARD by Marc Dugain
How does one deal with having part of your face blown off? Set in W.W.1. this question is dealt with in the context of a ward full of victims. Sparely written but projects hope, humanity and humour.

YEAR OF WONDERS by Geraldine Brooks
Set in the Plague Year of 1665, this novel is based on the actual events in the village of Eyam, which isolated itself from the world so as not to spread the plague. An unusual and absorbing read.

SONG OF NAMES by Norman Lebrecht
An absorbing story about a man whose life has been shaped by the disappearance of a childhood friend. Also a comment on the world of music, of musicians and their self absorption.

SPIES by Michael Frayn
In 1940’s Britain, two boys begin a game, pretending one of their mothers is a spy. The Game becomes deadly serious. 2002 Whitbread Book of the Year.

THE QUIET AMERICAN by Graham Greene
A ‘classic’ of modern times, set in Vietnam, prior to ‘the’ war. A ‘must read’.

THIS SIDE OF BRIGHTNESS by Colum McCann
This novel concerns the men who helped build the many tunnels under New York – and the social outcasts who live in the tunnels I modern times.

OLD FILTH by Jane Gardam
Eddie was sent home from the colonies (Borneo) as a five year old, put with child minders, then sent to school. He only saw his father once in the next fifteen years. What effect did this have on him as a man? Or on other RAJ orphans as they were known. A great read.

A LONG,LONG WAY by Sebastian
Barry Shortlisted for the Booker Prize, this is a poetic account of World War 1 from the viewpoint of an Irish lad, beautifully told, a coming of age story set in the grimmest circumstances.

WATER FOR ELEPHANTS by Sara Gruen
A story of Circus in the 1930s in America. Romance, Drama, Murder Intrigue…It has it all.

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD by Harper Lee A modern classic.
Set in the U.S. in the 1930s Deep South, it is a story of racial divisions and a man who stands by his principles .

THE BROKEN SHORE by Peter Temple
A crime thriller by an award winning Australian writer, this story deals with recognizable characters and real life situations.

THE ROAD HOME by Rose Tremain
Lev leaves his East European home to go to England. He needs to find his ‘life’ again – work, love, and his self respect. This is his journey to find the road home.

THE BIG SLEEP by Raymond Chandler
The classic tough guy Private Eye story, which reshaped the detective genre from the 1940’s on.

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE BRIDGE by Mary Lawson
This is another Canadian story – a family story. The main character is Arthur, the dutiful, reserved elder son. His brother Jake is a charming lazy ne’er do well whose aim in life seems to be to blight Arthur’s hopes and dreams. We read of their lives as others in the community who come in contact with them. A great study of character and places.

GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY By Mary Ann Schaffer
Told in a series of letters, this is a story of experiences of Guernsey’s people during the war. The characters are well drawn, and there is a bit of romance and intrigue. Charming.

BREATH by Tim Winton
A beautifully written tale set in the southwest of W.A., it explores the motivation and mindset of those who pursue extreme sports- in this case, surfing.

THE WOMEN IN BLACK by Madeleine St John
A piece of social history set in Sydney in the 1950’s. Looks at the lives of the ladies who work in the frock department of a large store.

THE SPARE ROOM by Helen Garner
What happens when you offer your spare room for a short time to a friend suffering from cancer? This reads like a diary, but the story evolves like a novel.

THE MERRY GO ROUND IN THE SEA by Randolph Stow A ‘classic’ of Australian literature of the 20th century. Set in Geraldton, it chronicles the 1941-1949, and how everyone’s life changed to some degree over some time.

REMARKABLE CREATURES by Tracy Chevalier
Another fiction based on fact from this author. Gives a great picture of life in early 19th century England, especially of the role and place of women in society. Two women who develop a passion for collecting fossils, and how they turn the scientific world on its head, provide the focus of the story.

JASPER JONES by Craig Silvey
A second novel from the author of ‘Rhubarb’, this story is set in a country town and narrated by a teenager who is frank, confused and a bit of an outsider. Well written depiction of life in a country town.

AFTER RIVER by Donna Milner
Set near the Canada /US border during the Vietnam war. River is a draft dodger who comes north to work on the farm, and changes all their lives.

THE THIRTY NINE STEPS by John Buchan
This classic is regarded as the forerunner to the modern thriller with the hero on the run while trying to prove his innocence. Interesting to compare it with today’s thrillers.

PAST THE SHALLOWS by Favel Parrett
Set in a fishing community in southern Tasmania, this is the sad story of three boys whose father is bitter and whose life is falling apart.

THE SPARROWS OF EDWARD STREET by Elizabeth Stead
Unable to find a home to rent, the Sparrow family find themselves in an old army camp on the edge of Sydney used by the Housing Commission as temporary accommodation after World War 2.

THE HARE WITH AMBER EYES by Edmund de Waal
Part biography, part family history, the author has traced the ownership of a netsuke collection within his family. In so doing, he recreates the period in which his forebears lived (Paris in the late 1800’s, Vienna 1900 to 1938) and in so doing, chronicles the rise of anti-Semitism in these cities. He also describes Japan’s emergence from the war.

A MOVEABLE FEAST by Ernest Hemingway
Hemingway’s last book is a memoir of the years he spent in Paris in the 1920’s. His poverty, drinking and gambling are mentioned, as are all the other writers living there at the time – Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound etc.

SNOWDROPS by A.D. Miller
Shortlisted for the 2011 Man Booker prize, this is a tale of life in Moscow in the heady post-Soviet days – the money, the deals, the cons – both on a business and personal level.

MY DEAR, I WANTED TO TELL YOU by Louisa Young
A moving and stark depiction of the horrors of World War One, and its’ effects on people, both men and women. It also reflects class attitudes of the time, and the redeeming power of love.

HOTEL ON THE CORNER OF BITTER AND SWEET by Jamie Ford
Set in the U.S. before and during World War 2 the story centres round the Chinese and Japanese who had made the West Coast States their home. The Japanese were interned into camps as the enemy, and this dislocated many lives and relationships.

BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP by S.J. Watson
A “thriller” about a woman whose amnesia means every day she has to learn who she is and about her life. Is what she’s told the truth? Will things change?

SENSE OF AN ENDING by Julian Barnes
The 2012 Man Booker prize winner is an older man’s meditation of his life, and how maybe his actions and attitudes could have been different.

ALL THAT I AM by Anna Funder
This novel is about people who really lived – Socialists who left Germany when Hitler came to power – Journalist, writers etc. Their life in 1930’s Britain was fraught with danger.

THE CAT’S TABLE by Michael Ondaatje
Three young boys are let loose on a ship travelling to England with minimal adult supervision. Their experiences during that journey colour their subsequent lives.

A PERFECTLY GOOD MAN by Patrick Gale
Set in Cornwall, this is the story of Barnaby Johnson, the local vicar. His childhood, his life, his crises of faith, written in Gale’s inimitable style.

HOUSE OF FICTION by Suzanne Swingler
This is a fascinating tale of real life. Suzanne Swingler is Leonard Jolley’s daughter, and this is her story of how she and her mother were left behind when Leonard went off with Elizabeth. You’ll not read one of Elizabeth’s stories in quite the same way again!

GARDEN OF EVENING MISTS by Tan Twan Eng
This story ranges over time from World War 11 to the 1990’s. Set in the Malaysian Cameron Highlands, it is the story of a garden and an unlikely romance.

BILLY LYNN’S LONG HALF TIME WALK by Ben Fountain
A group of young American ‘Squaddies’ have been brought home feted as heroes. It is a cynical look at modern America and its hypocrisy.

SCOOP by Evelyn Waugh
This delightful spoof, or parody, ridicules the media world of the 1930’s. Nothing much seems to have changed.

A GOLDEN AGE. by Tahmina Anam
Centred on the period of Bangladesh’s fight for independence from East Pakistan, this is also a story of a mother’s devotion to her two children and her fight to keep them safe.

BLACKWATTLE CREEK by Geoffrey McGeachin
Set in Victoria, this book has a strong cast of character, and a good picture of Australia at that time. The mystery revolves around the ‘A’ bomb tests at Maralinga, and the paranoia about ‘the red’s under the beds’ at the time.

LADY CYCLISTS GUIDE TO KASHGAR by Suzanne Joinson
Misguided missionaries in the 1920’s in Eastern China. An interesting mix of characters in a very different world.

TOBY’S ROOM by Pat Barker
Set against the backdrop of W.W.1 the main characters, suffer grief and loss which changes their lives.

MORNINGS IN JENIN by Susan Abulhawa
A sad chronicle of relations between Palestinians and Jews from 1945 to today.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR A HEATWAVE By Maggie O’Farrell
Dad has disappeared and the family are all back together for the first time for years. Secrets are revealed, problems are solved. Great characters.

NINE DAYS by Toni Jordan
In this Australian tale set in Melbourne, we follow the fortunes of one family over three generations. The characters are well drawn, and wit is well mixed with disappointment and sorrow.

THE WIDOW by Georges Simenon
Better known for his Margret detective series, this short work of Simenon’s is a detective series is a bleak story set in the French Countryside in the thirties. Although dark, it is well written in a simple, pared down style, and the characters are well drawn.

THE ROSIE PROJECT by Graeme Simpson
Told through the eyes of Don Tillman, a high functioning Asberger’s sufferer, this story is very amusing as he tells of his search for a wife. Behind the amusement however, is an illumination of the way people like Don function, so that we can have more understanding.

THE COAT ROUTE… by Meg Lukens Noonan
This is non-fiction – the story of the author’s tracing the elements making up a special overcoat – the fabric – its production, the lining and the history of the silk industry, the making of the buttons and so on. In all, it is a fascinating history of the bespoke tailoring industry, and some of the people involved.

ZERO AT THE BONE by David Whish Wilson
Set in Perth during the 80’s mining boom, this exposes Perth’s “underbelly” at the time. Frank Swann, an ex-detective, is engaged to investigate a suicide, and becomes involved in a much broader plot.

THE NIGHT GUEST by Fiona McFarlane
A book in which “what’s real and what’s imagined are terrifyingly difficult to distinguish”. Ruth is an elderly lady living alone in an isolated house. Her life is gradually “taken over” by Frieda, a carer, as she slides into dementia.

ALL THE BIRDS, SINGING by Evie Wyld
Told in two parts – past and present – Jake’s story will arouse plenty of discussion. This was the 2014 Miles Franklin Award winner.

THE UNLIKELY PILGRIMAGE OF HAROLD FRY by Rachel Joyce
Harold sets out to post a letter and ends up delivering it – at the other end of England. As he travels, he meets a variety of characters, and also sorts out his ideas about his own life.

LIST OF MY DESIRES by Gregoire Delacourt
Having won the lottery, Jocelyne is unable to tell her family, or decide what to do with the money. As you can imagine, troubles ensure.

BURIAL RITES by Hannah Kent
When a woman is convicted of complicity in a murder, she is sent to live with a family until her execution. This is a true story set in Iceland in 1829. Hannah Kent has imagined the effect of all this on the people involved.

THE UNDERTAKING by Audrey Magee
“An emotionally powerful portrait of two people holding on to the possibility of love and family in the midst of war. “(Financial Times). The story is set in Germany during World War 2.

NORA WEBSTER by Colm Toibin
The story of a woman coming to terms with her grief and finding herself after her husband’s death.

THE SHOCK OF THE FALL by Nathan Filer
Matthew’s life changed forever when his brother falls over a cliff. Is it his fault or just an unfortunate accident?

THE TEMPORARY GENTLEMAN by Sebastian Barry
A sad tale of a young man who ruins his life and his wife’s with his self deception, gambling and drinking.

CANNERY ROW by John Steinbeck
Life on the fringe of a fishing town breeds its own sense of community – with a cast of great characters.

MRS HEMINGWAY by Naomi Wood
Biographies of the four women who in turn become “Mrs Hemingway”.

THE FIRST TRUE LIE by Marina Mander
A young boy’s mother dies suddenly, and he faces the dilemma of who to tell, and what to do.

THE GOLDEN AGE by Joan London
In the early 1950’s, a polio rehabilitation hospital for children was located in Leederville in an old hotel – “The Golden Age”. This tale imagines some of the inmates, their families and their lives. (Shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Prize).

PAINT YOUR WIFE by Lloyd Jones
In the aftermath of the Second World War, one man teaches a community to appreciate each other and build on what they have.

LOVE IN SMALL LETTERS by Francesc Murailles
A light-hearted tale by a Portuguese writer, shows us how one small act can ultimately change our lives.

THE EYE OF THE SHEEP by Sophie Laguna
Miles Franklin Winner for 2015; this story told by a “difficult child covers many modern issues – family violence, alcoholism, fostering, irresponsible fathers, to name a few.

NOT FORGETTING THE WHALE by John Ironmonger
Joe is washed up naked on the beach of a remote village in Cornwall. His arrival is the catalyst for change in the community, bringing them together. Funny and heartwarming.

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WAR
Set in Berlin in the latter days of World War II, this story gives a graphic picture of the lives and hardships of the citizens.

THE LITTLE PARIS BOOKSHOP by Nina George
Jean Perdu has locked himself off from life for twenty years, then events propel him into a journey during which he rejoins the world.

UNBECOMING by Jenny Downham
Three generations of women, two of whom behave in an ‘unbecoming’ way. Covers several current issues.

THE READER ON THE 6.27 by Jean Didier Laurent
Another story about books and communication and how important the written word is.

MY SUNSHINE AWAY by M. O. Walsh
A book about being a teenager and growing up. Also how parents’ actions impinge on the children and influence the type of adults they become.

THE LAST PAINTING OF SARA DU VOS by Dominic Smith
A story of art fraud, interleaved with the life story of a 16th century Dutch woman artist.

BETWEEN A WOLF AND A DOG by Georgia Blain
A dysfunctional family, most of whom are facing difficult choices as to their lives’ direction.

MY BRILLIANT FRIEND by Elena Ferrante
Two girls growing up in a Naples slum in the 1950s . The narrowness of their lives influences their life choices . A runaway bestseller in the

U.S. COMING RAIN by Stephen Daisley
An Award winner from a local writer. Set in the bush in W.A , it has some great characters, including a dingo.

LIFE AND DEATH OF SOPHIE STARK by Anna North
Sophie is driven to create films, and along the way impacts on the lives of others – for better or worse.

FLIGHT OF DREAMS by Ariel Lawhon
The last flight of the Hindenberg is brought to life in this novel based on real people and events.

STORIES FROM SUBURBAN ROAD by Tom Hungerford
A classic short story collection from an eminent W.A. writer.

OLMEC OBITUARY by L.J.M. Owen
An archeological murder mystery, centuries old. The characters are based in Canberra.

DEPT OF SPECULATION by Jenny Offil
Diary of a relationship and marriage told in unusual style with quotes, thoughts and actions all noted.

BRITT MARIE WAS HERE by Frederick Backman
Britt Marie, after being virtually ignored all her life, finds herself as a soccer coach in a dying village.

BLACK ROCK, WHITE CITY by A.S. Patrie
2016 Miles Franklin winner. The story of a refugee couple in Melbourne, their past and their gradual movement forward intro the future.

GLORIOUS HERESIES by Lisa McInerney
A gritty look at life in post financial collapse Ireland, people caught up in circumstances they can do little to change.

FAMILY LIFE by Akhil Sharma
The story of a family stunned by a tragic accident to the eldest son. The family are Indian, and now live in New York.

MOTHERING SUNDAY by Graham Swift
A little gem of a book tells us of the events of one Sunday in the mid 1920’s and the life of one of the characters thereafter.

WATCHMAKER OF FILIGREE STREET by Natasha Pulley
Set in London in the 1800’s, this story borders on fantasy, but historically is correct. Mirrors society in Victoria England with well- developed characters.

THE SPINNING HEART by Donal Ryan
Told from the varying points of view of those involved, this story tells us of the impact of the financial collapse on a small Irish community.

THE DARK CIRCLE BY Linda Grant
Set in a TB Sanatorium in southern England in the early days of the N.H.S. We meet a mixed group of patients and learn of the impact of streptomycin on TB, and on their lives.

GIRL WAITS WITH GUN by Amy Stewart
Based on actual characters and events, this story set in rural America, and tells the story of the Kopp sisters, being targeted by the local bad guy.

WOOLGROWER’S COMPANION by Joy Rhodes
Set in rural Australia, Post World War II, chronicles life on the land in difficult times.

NAPOLEON’S LAST ISLAND by Tom Keneally
An historical novel telling of Napoleon’s relationship with a young girl and her family on St Helena. The family later came to Australia.

RULES OF BACKYARD CRICKET by Jack Serong A tale of crime and murder and the life of a young man who tried to live his life by the above rules.

GUSTAV SONATA by Rose Tremaine
The life story of a boy born in Switzerland in World War II. Describes life in those times, and follows Gustav and his friend as they grow up.

TRAVELS WITH MY AUNT by Graham Greene
A staid retired bank manager meets his “aunt” at his mother’s funeral, and his life will never to be the same again.

AN ISOLATED INCIDENT by Emily Maguire
A young woman is brutally murdered in a quiet country town. We read of the next three months from the point of view of her sister and a journalist, till the murderer is revealed.

I LET YOU GO by Claire MacKintosh
An unusual “thriller” which will keep you reading into the night. Excellent.

THE OUTRUN by Amy Liptrot The story of a young woman who returns to the Orkneys from London in an effort to escape her alcoholism. The natural world aids her recovery.

UNDER PARISIAN SKIES
A light romantic tale, set in the ballet world in Paris.

FAMILIAR THINGS by Hwang Sok-Yong
This Korean story is told from the viewpoint of a thirteen year old, after he and his mother are forced by poverty to live on a huge rubbish dump in order to survive.

HISTORY OF BEES by Maja Lunde
Told in those time frames, this story details how important bees are to our survival. We meet three families in different times, in different countries, and read how important bees are to their lives.

MIDWINTER BREAK by Bernard MacLaverty
A couple take a weekend break in Amsterdam and it becomes a pivotal point in their long marriage.

WARLIGHT by Michael Oondatje
Life during the latter stages of the war in London raises lots of questions for Nat and his sister Rachel. Many of these questions are answered when Nat grows up and investigates.

RESERVOIR 13 by Jon McGregor
A girl disappears, and as the years pass, we see how the local people adapt.

GOLDEN HILL by Francis Spufford
Set in the 17th century in New York, this is the story of a stranger who arrives with a mission. Interesting picture of the life of the times.

WHIPBIRD by Robert Drewe
A 160 year family reunion to the Cleary family and its offshoots sets the scene for an interesting day of events.

SMILE by Roddy Doyle
Lonely Victor meets a school contemporary in a bar and this prompts memories good and bad of school and the Christian Brothers.

NOONDAY by Pat Barker
A wartime story about the characters in Barkers previous 2 novels – “Life Class” and “Toby’s Room” and their lives and actions in wartime London.

60 SECONDS
60 seconds is how long it takes for a small child to drown. This novel explores the effects of such an event and the effect on the families involved.

THE YEAR OF THE FARMER by Rosalie Ham
Set in rural Eastern Australia, this story is about water and the control of it, as well as being a study of small town life and politics.

THE PASSENGERS by Eleanor Lemprecht
Sarah went to the U.S. as a war bride in 1945. Now in her old age she’s returning to Australia on a cruise ship with her granddaughter. She tells her story as they travel.

THE BOOKSHOP by Penelope Fitzgerald
A decision to open a bookshop in a small rural town arouses many different reactions. Florence is fighting the locals, the elements and even the supernatural.

THE LAST MAN IN EUROPE by Dennis Glover
This biographical novel tells us of the life of George Orwell. his obsession with his writing, battles with ill health and eventual success just before his death at aged 46.

NORMAL PEOPLE by Sally Rooney
The story of the relationship between two young people from High School through to University, it faces many challenges – mainly due to outsiders but ends with hope.

The following books are in use by Kalamunda Community Learning Centre Book Clubs only

They will be released once they have circulated to all
Kalamunda Community Learning Centre Book Clubs

TOO MUCH LIP by Melissa Lucashenko
The story of an indigenous family brought together by the impending death of their grandfather. Deals with many issues – the importance of family and country, racism, substance abuse, poverty and so on. Tragedy and comedy are well balanced.

VALLEY AT THE CENTRE OF THE WORLD by Malachy Tallack
A sympathetic view of a community living in an isolated situation and the importance of the relationships of those who live there. The characters all have different reasons for being there and different feelings about the place. THE

ITALIAN TEACHER by Tom Rachman
A picture of a man –who dominates the art world – and his families-plural a true narcissist nothing matters but him- and his art. Well drawn characters, a cynical view of art dealers, artists and the art world in general, sad, amusing with a twist in the tail.

FAREWELL MY ORANGE by Iwaki Kei
A novel about immigrants, family and education, the central theme is really about the importance of language. Set in Australia the story centres about two women, one from Nigeria, the other from Japan and their relationship.

THE ERRATICS by Vicki Laveau Harvie
This is a memoir of the authors family and the parent’s later years. Powerfully written with great descriptions and wonderful character depiction.

THE RULES OF SEEING by Joe Heap This novel is about learning to see-in fact as one character was blind and also the other person finally recognizing reality. It has some flaws as a story but arouses good discussion.

AKIN by Emma Donohue
“Is blood thicker than water?” seems to be the question posed in this story. Noah Selvaggio, aged 79, finds himself responsible for his great nephew, Michael, just as he embarks on a trip to Nice, where his family came from. He is a reluctant carer with no experience of children, but his attitudes change gradually.

THE WHITE GIRL by Tony Birch
N.S.W. in the 1960’s and the treatment of people with aboriginal blood. Odette battles to prevent granddaughter Sissy being taken away from her.

THE WEEKEND by Charlotte Wood
Three friends come together at the beach house of a good friend who has died. Their task is to clean it out for Sale. Their relationships and stories are all revealed as the weekend passes.

LILIAN’S EDEN by Cheryl Adam
Set in N.S.W in the mid 20th Century, this is the story of a war bride and the family she finds herself part of.

REBECCA by Daphne Du Maurier
A ‘classic’ from the early 1950’s, set mainly in Cornwall. The house, Manderley is as much a character as the people who live there.

THE MALLAIG LINK by Caro Ayre
Not the usual police story, as its’ about an officer who believes his superior is ‘bent’ and sets about proving it.

DELAYED RAYS OF A STAR by Amanda Lee Koe
Looks at the lives of three stars of the Thirties, and the toll of fame and politics on their careers.

SAVING MISSY by Beth Morley
Missy is an elderly, lonely women who finds it hard to let others into her life. As she does so, her life changes slowly, and she is able to re-establish contact with her children.

THERE WAS STILL LOVE by Favel Parrett
Love is what binds families even when they are at opposite ends of the world. Beautifully written story based on Parrett’s own family.

THE DANCING GIRLS by M.M Chouinard
A’Thriller’ of a different kind as we meet a serial killer who finds and tracks his victim on line.

THE CHANGING ROOM by Christine Sykes
A modern story of the people involved in a charity providing suitable clothes for women needing to improve their appearance in order to get a job. The work changes lives as well as clothes.

MY BROTHER JACK by George Johnson
An Australian classic from the 1950’s telling of life in Australia in the 1920’s and 1930’s.

THE SALT PATH by Raynor Wenn
The account of the author’s walk on the coastal footpath of South west England with her ill husband, over about eighteen months. It recounts the countryside, the variety of people encountered and the many challenges faced.

CONFESSIONS WITH BLUE HORSES by Sophie Hardach
How the mystery of their past lives in East Berlin are solved by Ella and Tobi as they unravel their family story.

HOW WE DISAPPEARED by Jing Jing
Lee Recounts the story of young women taken from their homes in Malaysia by the Japanese during World War 2. Listed for several prizes.

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